The Hypno-Psychotherapy College of UKCP

College Governance

Flag Statement Hypno-Psychotherapy originates in procedures and practices discovered and recorded over the last three hundred years. The first formal exploration and beneficial application of hypnotic phenomena began in the 1750’s. Increasing awareness, over the last 100 years, of the pervasiveness and importance in human experience of what are now more appropriately described as ‘altered state phenomena’ has led to huge shifts in theoretical understanding, convergence with discoveries emerging from modern neuro-science and much increased consistency in application. This has been accompanied by the creation of a substantial scientific literature. Hypnosis describes a range of naturally occurring states of altered awareness which may vary from momentary distractions and ‘absences’ through much enhanced states of relaxation to very deep states of inward focus and awareness..  The mental processes which can occur in any of these states, appropriately utilised, are generally far more flexible and potentially far more powerful in effecting change than those we can achieve in most everyday states of active conscious awareness.  These states may be induced quite formally or quite naturalistically, in an almost unnoticeable way, depending on the requirement of the problem, the capability of the practitioner and the needs of the client. As well as alleviating a range of disadvantageous habits and many physical ailments, Hypno-Psychotherapy also deals in deep-seated problems  involving themes and procedures in many ways similar to those addressed by many other branches of Psychotherapy. Hypno-Psychotherapists take a wide-ranging and eclectic view in helping clients to understand and to alleviate psychological difficulties. A variety of approaches are represented within the College. At one end of the spectrum Hypno-Psychotherapists base their case conceptualisation and therapeutic strategies in modern information processing models whilst others have emphases in other orientations ( e.g. Cognitive, Cognitive Analytic, Psychodynamic or Counselling modes ). In all cases,  practice differs from other forms of psychotherapy in the deliberate (direct and indirect) use of altered mental states and supporting therapeutic structures as the principal medium for effecting change. It should be emphasized that the methods and strategies used in Hypno-Psychotherapy, though powerful and often speedy in effect, also respect and are attuned to the qualities and characteristics of the individual client involved.   They seek to utilize and enhance the resources and capabilities that reside in all people, and do not by any means require the client to respond to any standardized technique or to fit into any standardized pattern. While flexibility is paramount, the working relationship in Hypno-Psychotherapy strives for equality between client and therapist, in providing a safe and supportive environment, where the client can explore and clarify relevant personal matters. In encouraging agreed modification of the client’s beliefs, emotional responses and behaviour, the problem may require the therapist to assume a more active or directive role. In shorter term engagements, it can be used to inculcate skills and overcome limiting habits or personal and social inhibitions.  During longer-term therapy, the working relationship may present a dynamic context for the client to examine and work through important self-protection issues, including the reframing and resolution of challenging early experiences and liberation from previous blocks to personal development. Hypno-Psychotherapy may be valuable to anyone seeking to resolve specific problems, or for personal development.        

Introduction The College of Hypno-psychotherapists includes organizations and individuals from a wide variety of psychotherapy approaches from within a range of psychotherapy traditions.  We work with the EAP (2003) definition of psychotherapy: “The practice of psychotherapy is the comprehensive, conscious and planned treatment of psychosocial, psychosomatic and behavioural disturbances or states of suffering with scientific psychotherapeutic methods, through an interaction between one or more persons being treated, and one or more psychotherapists, with the aim of relieving or removing symptoms, disturbed behavioural patterns and attitudes to change, and to foster the maturation, development and health of the treated person. It requires both a general and a specific training/education”. The knowledge, understanding and practice of Hypno-psychotherapists is a clearly demarcated and specialist area within the practice of psychotherapy. Hypno-psychotherapists work to the same basic standards and competencies as other modalities within psychotherapy.  Our practice is informed and under-pinned by theory and evidence from several psychotherapy traditions. We specialise in integrating and synthesising use of  the above theory and evidence with intentional use of hypnosis and altered conscious states, within an appropriate (client specific) therapeutic framework and a therapeutic relationship. Use of hypnosis and altered conscious states are the primary mechanisms and processes through which hypno-psychotherapists both treat a range of disturbances and also facilitate the reduction or removal of client’s problematic symptoms, behaviour patterns, feelings or attitudes.  Within psychotherapeutic relationships with clients, practitioners may use different types of work with hypnosis or altered state to facilitate a client’s maturation, development, and physical and mental health. The College’s training standards reflect both this specialism and the diversity of knowledge and practice.  They are intended to create a sound framework for good learning and practice that is flexible and can also encompass the different needs of member organizations, learners and future clients.

UKCP Guiding Principles   The following Guiding Principles have been agreed:
  • Trainings should both recognize the existence of different psychotherapies, based on different theories, and should also promote respectful understanding of differences between theories.
  • Training should be empirically and theoretically informed and practice based.
  • Training should be related to clinical work in the individual’s work context. This may apply to a multiplicity of occupational settings and environments.
  • Trainings should provide equity, transparency and accountability in their assessment processes.
  • Trainings should operate within an equal opportunities framework.

Application of the Standards in this document All Training Organisations will be reviewed against the Standards contained within this document at their next Quinquennial Reviews, and in the meantime agree to conform. Individuals put forward for registration with The College will need to meet the requirements and demonstrate these to the satisfaction of the OM. All registrants of the current College of Hypno-psychotherapists of UKCP will be able to comprehensively evidence achievement of the standards via provision of:
  • Evidence of successfully being assessed against relevant learning outcomes (on main course of study)
  • Records of hours worked within supervision, personal therapy and with  clients
  • Evidence of continuous professional development
  • Samples of other activities such as reflective diary keeping to demonstrate new syntheses and application of theory and practice

Entry Requirements to training The Hypno-psychotherapy Training Standards requirements should be read in conjunction with the UKCP 2012 Training Requirements.
  • Entry to training is at a Masters level of competence. Candidates should be in possession of a first degree (or equivalent certified qualification) before the course, or should be at “Masters level of competence” as a criterion for admission to those elements of training which are registered as mandatory components for UKCP registration, i.e. have a letter from a person of suitable academic authority, to certify “Masters level of competence” on the basis of clear criteria.
  • Training organisations should have in place appropriate procedures for assessing applicants’ ability to undertake such a training. These should normally include one or more of the following entry requirements:
    • an undergraduate degree
    • a relevant professional training
    • an independent assessment
    • Accreditation of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL)
    • Accreditation of Prior Certificated Learning (APCL)
(NB APL procedures are to enable training organisations to devise criteria that acknowledge formally a person’s relevant prior professional and life experience).
  • Applicants will also normally demonstrate the capacity and commitment to develop the following qualities that will make them suitable for the profession of psychotherapy:
    • a lively and enquiring mind
    • a capacity for critical reflection and self-directed learning
    • an ability to listen and respond with compassion and respect
    • awareness of prejudice and the ability to respond openly to issues of race, gender, age, sexual preference, class, disability, ethnic, spiritual / religious and cultural difference, and diversity
    • awareness and sensitivity in relation to the political, socio-cultural and religious / spiritual contexts of people’s lives
    • in-depth self-reflection
    • self-awareness and commitment to self-development. Applicants should have sufficient emotional competence and the internal resources necessary to engage with the demands of the training and the work of psychotherapy
1.4 Candidates should have relevant experience of working with people in a responsible role.  Training organisations should be able to substantiate the relevance of a candidate’s experience. Other relevant experience may include a candidate’s personal experience of therapy. 1.5  Training organisations should have in place: 1.5.1 appropriate procedures for acceptance and refusal of applicants including appropriate and published criteria and procedures for the selection of applicants 1.5.2 appropriate appeals procedures 1.5.3 an equal opportunities policy or procedures to ensure that applicants are not discriminated against on grounds of race, gender, age, sexual preference, class, disability or ethnic, religious and cultural difference.  

 Standards of Education and Training
  1. Introduction
  This document is to be read in conjunction with the UKCP Standards of Education and Training (2012): The Minimum Core Criteria. Psychotherapy with Adults. It provides modality specific criteria which are in addition to all the criteria within the central document. Within this document we refer to the central document as SETS.
  1. Section values
  SETS paragraph 2.9 states that “courses must be congruent with the values, principles, knowledge base and underpinning philosophical approach / approaches laid out by the relevant UKCP section”. These are as defined in the Hypno-Psychotherapy Governance document.
  1. Staff
  SETS paragraph 3.12 states that “courses should be led by appropriately qualified and experienced individuals, as defined by the relevant section”. Normally core training staff would be expected to be UKCP registered hypno-psychotherapists who maintain a private practice and/or employment as a hypno-psychotherapist. Psychotherapists from other modalities may be utilised for specialised elements of the training. Training staff would normally be expected to have additional training and/or experience in Training in addition to psychotherapy qualifications and to be subject to regular monitoring, including trainee feedback.
  1. Training requirements
  Training hours should be a minimum of 1800 hours over four years. This should include:
  1. a minimum of 625 hours of theoretical / methodological / practical training of which there should be a minimum of 500 classroom hours
  2. 250 hours personal development of which a minimum of 48 hours must be contracted psychotherapy, on an individual basis with a UKCP registered psychotherapist or equivalent. The purpose of all developmental processes, in this context, is as a support to the student as they progress towards the goal of being a psychotherapist. It may be equally concerned with development of resilience and awareness than with the resolution of personal issues, when this best supports the practitioner’s development towards effective and ethical practice. The contracted hours may be in any form or forms of psychotherapy recognised by UKCP or BACP or BPS. Recognised modality specific practices in personal development include:
  • therapeutic tasking journalled by the individual and/or monitored by the contracted psychotherapist
  • personal developmental quests journalled by the individual and monitored by the Training Organisation
  • journalled utilisation of self-hypnosis within a structured personal development course e.g. Mindfulness Training
  • attendance of group therapy with a registered Psychotherapist.
  More hours may, of course, be conducted but only 250 hours count towards the 1800 total.  All personal development hours are to be collated in a journal, counter-signed where appropriate (e.g by therapists NB training hours must be clearly delineated from personal development hours and no hour can be used twice.
    1. 450 hours of clinical practice. More hours may, of course, be conducted but only 450 hours count towards the 1800 total. Clinical practice is defined as “time specifically contracted for the professional delivery of psychotherapeutic treatment, administered within the relevant codes of confidentiality, accountability and informed consent”. Trainees must ensure clients are aware of their trainee status. Use of therapeutic skills within practices other than psychotherapy do not count towards the total. Training organisations should have a system of APL for practice hours up to a maximum of 25%. APLed hours should be commensurate with hypno-psychotherapy hours, e.g. hours conducted in another psychotherapy modality.
 
    1. 1 hour of supervision per 6 hours of client work. For the 450 hours this would mean 75 hours would be expected. More hours may, of course, be conducted but only 75 hours count towards the 1800 total. The maximum number in a Supervision group should not normally exceed four.
 
  1. Accreditation of Prior / Experiential Learning
  Training organisations may, at their discretion, offer APL /APEL for suitably qualified candidates up to a maximum of 50% of the course content and 1 year of the 4 year process. This would normally be for either the hypnosis/hypnotherapy elements of the course OR a proportion of the psychotherapeutic elements. Procedures should be in line with QAA guidelines.
  1. Theory and practice
  SETS paragraph 2.1 requires there to be
  1. a model of the person and the mind. This is as defined in the section governance document.
b.a model of gendered and culturally influenced human development. This is as defined in the section governance document.
    1. a model of human change and ways in which change can be facilitated. Our modality’s key difference to others is the method of facilitating change and therefore this must be a primary component of all trainings.
    2. a set of clinical concepts to relate theory to practice. As with c, hypno-psychotherapy is rich in such clinical concepts and it would normally be expected that trainings include a wide range rather than relying heavily on one or two techniques.
    3. an extensive literature which includes a critique of the model. Clearly, given the integrative nature of the modality, there is a plethora of literature to support the psychotherapeutic base, but also there is much to support the integration of hypnosis within the process.
 
  1. Core curriculum
  Training OMs are required to teach the minimum core curriculum as defined by section.
  1. Supervised practice
  Supervision is required at a ratio of 1:6 throughout the period of training. Section requires training organisations to approve the training supervisor for each student. At least one third of a student’s supervision should normally be from a UKCP registered hypno-psychotherapist or equivalent. The other two thirds of approved supervision may be through work placements or from within other modalities, but it would still be expected that normally the supervision would be received from a UKCP registered psychotherapist or equivalent. Section recognises the use of cross-modality supervision for those post-registration, but feels it necessary that during training the student has access to someone within the modality. It would not normally be acceptable for the supervision to be undertaken by the primary tutor. Section recognises the range of practice settings within which a trainee may complete their practice hours, from private practice, to employment and voluntary placements. It is the responsibility of the Training Organisation, in communication with Supervisors, to ensure that the Trainee is practicing within a suitable practice environment, within their limits of knowledge and competence and for which their training has prepared them.
  1. Mental health placement
  In line with central UKCP policy, a mental health placement is a requirement for all students, with the exception of those who already have experience of working in this field. Training organisations are required to produce a policy, and ensure its adherence, which enables students to learn about the wider mental health field including obtaining an opportunity to develop the capacity to recognise severely disturbed clients (as per SETS paragraph 2.13). The placement does not necessarily have to be one in which the student practises as a psychotherapist within a mental health context.
  1.  Assessment
  Assessment will be designed to ensure that the Trainee can demonstrate the appropriate levels in all three categories of Theoretical Understanding, Practical Ability and Psychological Maturity. Assessment processes will be a combination of formative, staged and summative events, using multi-modal procedures supportive of best opportunity for the Trainee to demonstrate their learning and achievement. Combinations of assessment modes will normally include written pieces based on home study, practical examinations, written examinations (seen or unseen papers may be preferred) and individual and group tasks. Each TO will make overt to Trainees the assessment processes and requirements of the course, with feedback processes to inform how performance can be improved to overcome shortfall as part of a meaningful learning journey. A Trainee who seems unable to reach requirements will be informed at the earliest reasonable stage of training to insure their investment is not wasted. Supervisor’s reports will form a part of any final assessment for Accreditation, and a monitoring process between Training Organisation and Supervisor will be practiced over the course of the Trainee’s Clinical Practice. A requirement of Accreditation shall be an original written dissertation of not less than 10,000 words, relevant to the practice of Hypno-Psychotherapy. This piece will be Internally and Externally assessed and will normally be submitted as a final stage of theoretical assessment. SETS paragraph 4.11 states that “all assessment measures should be consistent with an effective and rigorous process through which it is possible to demonstrate compliance with external reference frameworks”. Until there are National Occupational Standards for psychotherapy, section invokes the use of definitions provided by the European Association for Hypno-Psychotherapy and UKCP.
  1. Qualification and registration
  Within our modality students are considered qualified to practice, under supervision, in advance of their ability to register with UKCP. TOs must make it explicit in all materials as to what elements are contained in the pre-qualification section, and which in the post-qualification, and where and when these are covered. Continued support should be offered to students as they work towards registration. Throughout the process it is necessary for the training organisation to ensure the clarity of the process for the student, and for the student to be clear with their clients as to where they are on the pathway.

Supervision Standards

1.         Introduction

  1.1  This document outlines a framework for standards of Supervision for members of the College of Hypno-psychotherapists working with adults.  For the purposes of this and all other UKCP documents the term adult is understood to refer to any person who is 18 years and over in age. The term child is understood to refer to anyone under the age of 18 years.   1.2  The development of these standards is essential for Colleges/OMs offering trainings in Psychotherapy and Psychotherapeutic Counselling, Supervision for working with adults or where the OM is an accrediting organisation for the purpose of putting people to a register of UKCP Supervisors.   1.3  For the purpose of this document the term psychotherapeutic practitioner throughout will refer to both psychotherapists and psychotherapeutic counsellors. The term Trainee Practitioner will refer to those trainees on either psychotherapy or psychotherapeutic counselling trainings starting to / seeing clients.   1.4  The authors wish to acknowledge the contribution to this current document from present and previous members of the UKCP Training Standards Committee (TSC) working groups on supervision and the work done by the UKCP Psychotherapy with Children Committee (PwCC) in helping to create part of the format of this current version.     1.5  This document takes the view that the supervision of clinical practice with clients whether by a psychotherapeutic counsellor or a psychotherapist requires similar levels of attention to the nature and standards of supervision. Such an approach is seen as being in line with the principles of protection of the public interest and of safeguarding the client.   1.6  Definition Supervision is understood as a process conducted within a formal working relationship in which a qualified or trainee psychotherapeutic practitioner presents client work to a designated supervisor, as a way of learning how to work more effectively with clients. The purpose is to ensure safe and competent practice through regular meetings.   1.7  It is acknowledged that no document can be exhaustive in its scope, however the guidelines set out below are intended to set a tone, character and attitudinal approach to supervision.   1.8  As with all the Training, Education and Practice Guidelines and Requirements of UKCP, these guidelines should be understood as forming part of the quality assurance and regulatory map of UKCP, its Colleges and its OMs.   1.9  Please see the list at the end of this section for the correct titles of all other UKCP documents relating to minimum generic guidelines and requirements for education and training standards of supervision and routes to supervisor accreditation, including specific documents relating to working with children.  

2.         Minimum Standards for Supervision of Psychotherapy Practitioners working with Adults

 

2.1.      The Nature of Supervision

 
  1. Supervision is a process conducted within a formal working relationship in which a qualified or trainee psychotherapeutic practitioner presents his or her client work to a designated supervisor as a way of enhancing their practice through careful reflection and reflexive practice on the process.
 
  1. Supervision can take place on a one to one basis or in groups. Supervision can take place through a variety of media (e.g. face to face, telephone, e-mail); and using different methods (e.g. live, audio or videotaped, written and reported).
 

2.2.      Purpose

 
  1. The primary purpose of supervision is to enhance the professional development of the supervisee so as to ensure the best possible psychotherapeutic practice for their client. To this end supervision should perform the functions of education, support and evaluation against the norms and standards of the modality, profession and of society.  This is the case irrespective of employment or voluntary arrangements and applies both in private and public service.
 
  1. Supervision can also contribute towards a gate-keeping process that allows for the recognition of certain situations, e.g. burnout, where because of the supervisee’s physical, mental, psychological or emotional state it is unsuitable for them to work with clients.
 

2.3.      Tasks of supervision

Supervisors need to be aware of the broad range of tasks that their role entails. These include:
  1. Creating an open, trusting working alliance with supervisees in which the supervisee is confident to reveal the difficulties within his/her work.
b   Being supportive – providing affirmation of good practice, colleagueship in assisting the supervisee in handling the difficulties encountered in their practice.
  1. Taking an educative role – using coaching skills, or aspects of mentoring to enlarge the supervisee’s theoretical knowledge and to highlight areas of further training.
d   Recognizing that there is a normative role in supervision that includes upholding the standards of good professional practice, guiding and supporting supervisee’s in addressing ethical issues, balancing the needs of supervisee and client and addressing issues of safety and right conduct.
  1. Ensuring that any client protection issues are being dealt with effectively.
  2. Addressing and encouraging understanding of any diversity and equalities issues in the work.
  3. Enabling new insights and understanding to emerge in the process of the work.
  4. Where there is a requirement by the organization the therapist is employed by there may be an evaluative role.
 

3.         Psychotherapeutic Practice with Adult Clients

Working with different client groups therapeutically can present unique challenges to the practitioner.  

3.1.      Potential Emotional Pressures for Psychotherapeutic Practitioners

These pressures can include:
  1. Pressure to change the client to meet the norms of society, culture, or organizations.
  2. Feeling overly responsible for very vulnerable clients.
  3. The ability of the client to be in control of their therapeutic process.Examples of this include issues around referral, fees, timing, termination, autonomy and confidentiality.
  4. The extra emotional demands that dealing with severely troubled clients can place upon the practitioner and the need to be supported in working with such clients.Psychotherapeutic work with all clients can at times accumulate as strong reactions that can be consciously or unconsciously acted upon or experienced psychosomatically.
  5. Dealing with difficult feelings around the lack of adequate care, protection and psychotherapeutic support for vulnerable and / or marginalised client groups.
  6. Dealing with one’s feelings, thoughts and ability to cope with own limitations, prejudices and / or lack of understanding of a particular client group or socio-cultural group.
 

3.2.      Clinical Issues

 
  1. Dealing with complex legal and ethical issues such as confidentiality, record keeping and client protection especially when dealing with highly vulnerable adults, particularly those who may be receiving more than one form of care / intervention.
  2. Working within systems that provide support, care and protection for highly vulnerable adults.
  3. Referring and liaising with other professionals and managing appropriately the different relationships and roles they may undertake at any given time.This requires a high degree of flexibility and alertness to possible conflicts of interest.
  4. Dealing with the complexities of third party referrals and the problems that can be generated in such circumstances
  5. The referral of clients who may be exhibiting symptoms of undiagnosed mental ill-health or developmental deficits that require specialist assessment, and / or onward referral where it is felt beyond the competence or remit of the practitioner.
  6. The need to be responsive, creative and flexible in order to meet the client appropriately and effectively.
  7. A willingness to refer the client to a more suitable approach / practitioner when necessary.
  8. An understanding of the clinical applicability and an ability to work with issues of diversity and equalities in the psychotherapeutic relationship.

 

  1. Professional Obligations
  2. Being able to recognise and act appropriately when the situation requires a heightened duty of care towards vulnerable and / or unstable clients.
  3. It is recommended that even very experienced practitioners seek the guidance and support of professional supervision (non-peer) from time to time.
  4. It is mandatory that recently qualified practitioners (less than three years in practice as a registrant) and ALLtrainees working with clients are in professional supervision.
  5. In the case of the recently qualified practitioner normally they should have regular professional supervision alongside any peer supervision arrangements that may be in place.
  6. For the first three years post registration a supervisionary relationship must be in place with a supervisor who meets the current requirements of the College for being a supervisor. It is the joint responsibility of the supervisor and supervisee to determine the appropriate frequency and duration of supervision sessions and the justification of these factors will form part of the registrant’s renewal of membership with their organisational member (if they belong to one) or with the College (if they are a direct registrant).
  7. The College believes that face to face supervision is ideal. Any other contact would need to be justified as above.
  8. In the first three years participation in peer support groups is to be encouraged, as a CPD process, but does not replace supervision as above.
  9. Following the first three years of registration the registrant may opt for peervision. In this case the responsibility for frequency and duration is held jointly by all members of the peergroup and all would be expected to take part in the justification as above.
  10. For all practitioners it is recognized that working with severely disturbed, traumatized or abused clients will require higher rates of supervision.
  11. Supervisors may advise additional supervision where deemed necessary.
  12. Failure on the part of the supervisee to heed such advice must be addressed in supervision and should be noted by the supervisor.
  13. Supervisors should be encouraged to seek guidance, advice and support from their own supervision supervisor, from the College or UKCP centrally dependant on the nature of the issue.
  14. Where the refusal to heed the advice given is understood by the supervisor as in any way an endangerment to the client the supervisor must inform the appropriate professional bodies of the practitioner. The supervisor must inform the supervisee in writing of this action and keep a copy on file.

5.         Ratios for Group Supervision and additional obligations

 
  1. Group supervision provides the practitioner with invaluable opportunities for shared learning and support.
b   Group supervision normally should be on a ratio of a minimum of 30 minutes of supervision per supervisee.
  1. The maximum group size normally would be four.
 
  1. The Supervisors Responsibility to Self
These responsibilities include:
  1. Receiving appropriate supervision of their supervision.
  2. Appropriate continuing professional development to keep up to date with developments in the field of adult psychotherapy.
iii. Awareness of their own limitations including awareness of overload and potential burn-out; the supervisor must take adequate steps to allay these, including being willing to take a break from practice when necessary.  

6.1Standards for Supervisors

 
  1. That the supervisor has undertaken training in psychotherapeutic supervision. (See documents on Grandparenting and for Supervision Training)
  2. The supervisor must hold a qualification or demonstrate experience in line with the UKCP standards for registered Psychotherapists and Psychotherapeutic Counsellors. (See documents on Grandparenting and for Supervision Training)
  3. The supervisor must have a recognized qualification appropriate to the level of supervision being offered.
  4. Wherever possible, they should also have training and / or qualifications relevant to working with the client group (group work, couples, minorities etc.).
  5. If the supervisor has no formal training to work as a supervisor of that client group, then they must have substantial experience of working psychotherapeutically with the specific client group or groups and have received supervision for such work. g.The supervisor must have a thorough understanding of current legal and ethical issues that pertain to working with clients. They must work to the Code of Practice and Complaints Procedure relevant to the UKCP, UKCP Section and / or the service provider they are employed by.
  6. Supervisors should have experience of working with more than one socio-cultural identity group (gender, race, class, age etc.)
  7. Supervisors must have suitable Professional Indemnity Insurance for their work.
  6.2 Responsibility to the Supervisee
  1. The supervisor must make a contract with the supervisee incorporating into the contract a clear understanding of their clinical responsibilities
  2. If the supervisor is to have an evaluative role and be required to report on the supervisees work then this should be discussed in the initial contracting session.
  3. Supervisors must be clear when contracting with supervisees, as to what action they would take if they were concerned about the supervisee’s work or capacity to practice.
  4. Supervisors must clarify if the supervisee is covered by Professional Indemnity Insurance; and should request that the supervisee addresses this immediately if they are not covered.
  Acknowledgement: Please note these guidelines are the culmination of work done by several organisations and individuals within and without the UKCP over a number of years across several modalities. All the contributors, known and unknown, are thanked for their thoughts, ideas, efforts and contributions. Documents Training Standards of UKCP  – 1993 UKCP Training Standards: Policy and Principles – 2001 Psychotherapy with Children; UKCP Guidelines for Training -2003 Psychotherapy with Children; Principles, Aims and Guidelines for Training –2007 and 2008 UKCP Standards of Education and Training -2012

Supervision Standards of Education and Training  
  1. Introduction
    • UKCPhistorically has agreed principles on which to base its Training Standards and policies to regulate them across all psychotherapeutic modalities. These principles and policies concern the Council’s Training Standards Committee, the Colleges’ Training Standards Committees and Accreditation Committees, and the individual Training Organisations that devise and run psychotherapy and psychotherapeutic counselling training courses leading to registration with the Council.
    • Basic Training Standards were established in 1993 and published as ‘TrainingRequirements of UKCP’. A Regulatory Framework to integrate the Training Standards with Training Outcomes was agreed in 2001 and published as UKCP Training Standards: Policy and Principles.
    • This document aims to make clear the route by which qualified and experienced practitioners can reach College accreditation and formal registration as a UKCP Supervisor for adult client work through the Training Route.
    • Purpose: The primary purpose of supervision is to enhance the professional development of the supervisee so as to ensure the best possible psychotherapeutic practice for their client. To this end supervision should perform the functions of education, support, and evaluation against the norms and standards of the profession and of society. This is the case irrespective of employment arrangements and applies both in private and public service.
    • Supervision often can also contribute towards a gate-keeping process that allows for the recognition of certain situations, e.g. burnout, (where because of the supervisee’s physical, mental, or emotional state it is unsuitable for them to work with clients); lack of clinical capacity to deal with the client’s issues, etc.
    • The development of these standards is essential for Colleges where their Member Organisations (OMs) wish to run supervision training courses and put forward accredited supervisors to be placed on the UKCP Register of Supervisors for Adult Psychotherapy and Adult Psychotherapeutic Counselling or where the Member Organisation (OM) is an accrediting organisation solely for the purpose of putting suitably qualified practitioners to the register of supervisors.
    • The development of these standards establishes therequirement for Colleges to work towards the inclusion of OM Supervision Training Courses in College course approval and quinquennial review processeswhere the course and / or accreditation processes of the OM is intended to put forward accredited supervisors to the UKCP Register of Supervisors.
    • Please see the list at the end of this document for the correct titles of other UKCP documents relating to minimum generic guidelines and requirements for education and training standards of supervision and routes to supervisor accreditation, including specific documents relating to working with children.
 

2. Course Requirements

 
  • All training courses must publish:
1    Selection criteria 2    Selection procedures 3    Selection Appeals procedures 4    APL and APEL procedures 5    Codes of Ethics for trainers, supervisors, supervisor trainees 6    Codes of Conduct and Practice for trainers, supervisors and supervisor trainees 7    Diversity and Equality Policy and Procedures, including addressing these issues in the curriculum specifically 8    A Curriculum and course Learning Outcomes 9    Written and practical course requirements 10Assessment procedures and assessment appeals procedures 11Staff / trainers appointment procedures 12Staff / trainers names, relevant qualifications and relevant professional memberships  
  • All training courses must:
 
  1. a) Where the course is intended to train appropriately qualified practitioners to supervise work with children as well as adults – the training programme must include all those additional elements as specified in the current Guidelines for Supervisors published by the UKCP Psychotherapy with Children Committee (PwCC);
  2. b) Contain both theoretical teaching and supervised supervision as components required to achieve the competences of a supervisor;
  3. c) Reflect responsibility for transparency and accountability as relevant and important in the training and in the practice of supervision;
  4. d) Cover more than one theoretical model of supervision
  5. e) Include at least one form of assessment of work with a supervisee and one piece of written work exploring the theory and practice of supervision
  6. f) Include production / presentation of a short written model of their Supervision Framework including style, approach and understanding of supervision and reflection on practice (we recommend that this should be no more than 1.5 to 2 sides of A4 typed);
  • The procedures, policies and requirements of the supervision training course should satisfy the minimum requirements and guidelines set out in this and allied documents relating to registration as a UKCP Supervisor of Psychotherapeutic Counsellors and/or a UKCP Supervisor of Psychotherapists.
 
  • Identify and specify the personal and professional qualities, background and previous experience that make candidates suitable for training in the profession of psychotherapeutic supervisor.
 
  • All requirements, policy, procedures and practice must demonstrate adherence, content and positive intent to diversity and equality best practice.
 
  • Minimum Compulsory Entry Requirements to Training:
 
  • Relevant UKCP professional qualification or UKCP recognised professional equivalent.
 
  • UKCP Registrant of good standing or UKCP recognised professional equivalent.
 
  • Normally, at least 5 years’ experience of work with clients as a psychotherapeutic practitioner or the equivalent of approximately 1560 hours, which means an average of 6 clients per week over 5 years.
 
  • Normally, at least three years of this experience must be post-registrationas a UKCP Psychotherapist, Psychotherapeutic Counsellor or UKCP recognised professional equivalent.
 
  • Multiple Registration:
 
  1. Where Supervisors wish to be registered to supervise practitioners working with children and adults they must fulfil the requirements set out in the current UKCP supervision documents that relate to eachclient group.
 
  1. Where Supervisors wish to be registered to supervise practitioners from both the Psychotherapeutic Counselling and Psychotherapy Registers they must have an equivalence of qualification or reasonably wide experience of the work and contexts of the professional group being supervised.
   
  • Learning Outcomes (recommended for training course routes leading to registration as a UKCP Supervisor):
 
  • Demonstrates an ability to foster an open, trusting working alliance with supervisees in which the supervisee is confident to reveal the difficulties and challenges within his/her work.
 
  • Is able to demonstrate fulfilment of the following aspects of the supervision role:
 
  1. Supportive– providing affirmation of good practice, colleagueship in assisting the supervisee in handling the difficulties and challenges encountered in their practice.
  2. Educative– using coaching skills, or aspects of mentoring to enlarge the supervisee’s theoretical knowledge and to highlight areas for further training.
  3. Normative– upholding standards, values and principles of good professional practice, guiding and supporting supervisee in addressing ethical issues, balancing needs of supervisee and client, addressing issues of safety and appropriate conduct.
 
  • Demonstrates ability to match the style of the supervision to the experience and individual needs of the supervisee, with a particular emphasis on demonstrating understanding and capability to work with diversity and equality considerations and issues.
 
  • Is able to work with different ways of evidencing the supervisee’s practice according to OM and College specific methodologies, such as CD-Rom, audio or video tapes, transcripts, ‘live’ supervision etc., and to request these as appropriate, with due regard to equalities considerations.
 
  • Shows an ability to recognise specific abilities as well as limits of the supervisee, these may be socio-cultural, temperamental, physical or exist within the context of the supervisee’s life.
 
  • Demonstrates an ability to work with differences in relation to supervisees and show a similar awareness and capability within their own understanding.
 
  • Demonstrates an ability to understand and critique work from the standpoint of the client, the therapist and the supervisor.Recognise and be able to work with the parallel systems, processes and transferential or similar processes among these and the environment as applicable to the modality approach(es) to supervision.
 
  • Demonstrates an understanding of why and how supervision requires knowledge, experience and skills in addition to those required by a qualified psychotherapeutic practitioner.
 
  • Demonstrates an ability to understand the principles, values and ethical issues particular to the practices of psychotherapy and psychotherapeutic counselling which need to be understood, communicated and adhered to.
 
  • Reflects responsibility for transparency and accountability as relevant and important in the training and in the practice of supervision.
 
  1. Ethics & Practice
  • Supervisors registered with UKCP are required to abide by the existing codes appropriate to them. Section four contains UKCP guidelines and recommendations from which UKCP Colleges and OMs are recommended to formulate their own codes. Please note these may relate to the individual supervisor, the trainee supervisor and the training organisation.
 
  • All supervisors are to be bound by Codes of Ethics, Conduct and Practice appropriate to them through their UKCP OM (if they belong to one) and UKCP College.
 
  • Supervisors should conduct themselves in a way that is consistent with the dignity, status, values and principles of the profession and of UKCP.
 
  • Supervisors shall seek to establish the highest ethical standards and shall hold the interests of clients to be paramount.
 
  • Supervisors may not supervise beyond their training and experience.
 
  • Supervisors are responsible for maintaining and developing their skills through appropriate Continued Professional Development.
 
  • Supervisors are responsible for monitoring and maintaining their physical, mental and emotional health in relation to their fitness to practice.
 
  • Professional Considerations:
 
  1. Supervisors are expected to manage their work in a professional manner. For example, are expected to disclose their qualifications when requested and not claim, or imply, qualifications that they do not have.
 
  1. Supervisors need to consider whether their approach to the work is appropriate for a particular supervisee and be prepared to make referrals at any stage in the work if that appears to be in the supervisee’s and / or client interest.
 
  1. Supervisors should use such experiences to help them identify their own further training needs.
 
  1. There is a distinction between line management supervision and psychotherapeutic supervision. Best practice is normally that the same person should not act as both line manager and psychotherapeutic supervisor to the same supervisee.
 
  1. Where this (d. above) is unavoidable, clear written guidelines should be in place covering the remit of each role and specifying procedure for any disputes or conflicting situations arising.
 
  1. Supervisors must define and maintain a consistent working environment with clear boundaries. For example: Supervisors must make clear the boundaries of time and space, explain the arrangements for payment of fees at the outset and give adequate notice of any changes or planned breaks.
 
  1. It is considered best practice for supervisors and their supervisees to agree a contract that makes clear the expectations and requirements they have of each other. If the contract is verbal, the supervisor should keep a note of the agreed contract and the date it was made.
 
  1. It is considered best practice to have a policy regarding giving references and any fees that may be charged for this or any other work done outside the session time.
 
  1. When working with trainees the boundaries of the supervisor’s responsibility and accountability to their supervisees and the agency / training should be clarified, preferably in writing.
 
  1. Trainings would normally be expected to keep a record of the name, qualifications, professional body and contact details of supervisors seeing trainees including placement supervisors where relevant.
 
  1. This is compulsory for all supervisors designated as training supervisors for the purpose of acquisition of supervised practice hours by the trainee including placement supervisors where relevant.
   
  1. Supervisors must not exploit the dependence of the supervisee in the supervisory relationship sexually, financially, or in any other manner.
 
  1. Supervisors must have adequate insurance cover for their work.
 
  1. Supervisors should discuss with supervisees the need to have arrangements in place to take care of the immediate needs of clients in the event of a sudden and unplanned ending to the therapy relationship that is being supervised. This would include a “professional will” where appropriate to the modality or the practitioner (UKCP recommends the use of a ‘professional will’).
 
  1. It is good practice for the supervisor to ensure they are informed by the supervisee of the arrangements made for n. above.
 
  1. Supervisors are responsible for similar safeguards for their own practice.
 
  1. Confidentiality:As a general principle, supervisors must not reveal confidential material concerning the supervisee or their clients to any other person without the express consent (preferably in writing) of all parties concerned. Safeguarding exceptions are understood and may apply, these should be noted in detail.
  4.9 Issues of Responsibility:
  1. Within a contract supervisors are responsible for helping supervisees to reflect upon their work, while at the same time acknowledging that clinical responsibility remains with the supervisee.
 
  1. Where the supervisee is a trainee normally at least, joint clinical responsibility would be understood to be shared between the supervisor and the trainee. Guidelines would ideally be created for students on placements and placement supervisors in a similar manner.
 
  1. It is important that those supervisors seeing supervisees who work with children are aware of the additional responsibilities and legal expectations the supervision role may entail. (Please see the UKCP PwCC Supervision documents on working with children).
  2. Supervisors must recognise and work in ways that respect the value and dignity of supervisees, their clients and the context of the work.
 
  1. Good regard should be given to equality and diversity issues and considerations such as origin, status, race, culture, gender, age, beliefs, sexual orientation and disability.
 
  1. (4.8.c-e. above) Should include raising awareness of potential interventions for working effectively with diversity and equalities issues as they arise in the work.
 
  1. (4.8.c-e. above) Must include raising awareness of any discriminatory practices that may exist between the supervisee and their clients, or between the supervisor and supervisee.
  4.10Legal Liabilities:
  1. Supervisors must ensure that together with their supervisees, they consider their legal liabilities to each other, to the employing or training organisation, if any, and to the clients.
 
  1. The supervisor is responsible for clarifying the legal liabilities from an informed position, and seeking legal guidance when necessary including seeking advice from College / UKCP when necessary and as appropriate.
 
  1. Supervisors are responsible for taking action if they are aware that their supervisee’s practice is not in accordance with relevant Codes of Ethics, Conduct and Practice.
 
  1. It is important that those supervisors seeing supervisees who work with children are aware of the additional responsibilities and legal expectations your supervision role may entail. (Please see the UKCP PwCC Supervision documents on working with children).
 
  1. Supervisors are responsible for helping their supervisees recognise when, in their opinion, their functioning as practitioners or trainee practitioners is impaired due to personal or emotional difficulties, any condition that affects judgement, illness, the influence of alcohol or drugs, or for any other reason, and for ensuring that the appropriate action is taken.
 
  1. Supervisors are required to refrain from behaviour that may be detrimental to the public, clients, the profession, colleagues, supervisees or the members and / or organs of UKCP.
    4.11 Advertising:
  1. Where they choose to advertise their services, supervisors are expected to advertise services with descriptive rather than evaluative statements.
 
  1. The media should not be used in any way that would bring the profession, or the members and / or organs of UKCP into disrepute.
  Acknowledgement: Please note these guidelines are the culmination of work done by several organisations and individuals within and without the UKCP over a number of years across several modalities. All the contributors known and unknown, are thanked for their thoughts, ideas, efforts and contributions. Documents Training Standard of UKCP  – 1993 UKCP Training Standards: Policy and Principles – 2001 Psychotherapy with Children; UKCP Guidelines for Training -2003 Psychotherapy with Children; Principles, Aims and Guidelines for Training -2007 UKCP Standards of Education and Training: Policy and Principles 2012  

Supervisor Grandparenting
  1. Introduction
    • In this document the aim is to make clear the route by which already established supervisors can reach College accreditation and formal registration with UKCP as a Supervisor through the route know as Grandparenting.
 
  • This document is not at all involved in the formatting of individual registrants’ supervision choices.
 
  • For the purpose of this document the term psychotherapeutic practitioner throughout will refer to both psychotherapists and psychotherapeutic counsellors working with adults.
 
  • This document takes the view that the supervision of clinical practice with clients whether by a psychotherapeutic counsellor or a psychotherapist requires similar levels of attention to the nature and standards of supervision. Such an approach is seen as being in line with the principle of protection of the public interest and of safeguarding the client.
 
  • For the purposes of this document the term adult is understood to refer to any person who is 18 years and over in age. The term child refers to any person under the age of 18 years.
 
  • In this context Grandparenting can be defined as the process of recognising the skills and knowledge of an individual who has not completed a UKCP accredited training programme in Supervision, but who nevertheless meets the minimum standards set by the Training Member Organisation, by virtue of their considerable proven, relevant, professional experience ranging over a reasonably long period of time.
 
  • Grand-parented individuals will have trained and /or developed their expertise in the field of supervision before the development of the new custom and practice of course recognition in Supervision.
 
  • While the individual may have had minimal sustained formal training in this field, their long professional experience and professional development will be such that they will have achieved equivalence to learning outcomes as stipulated in the document UKCP College of Hypno-psychotherapists Standards for Supervision and can evidence such equivalence.
 
  • UKCP accreditation as a supervisor of psychotherapeutic practitioners working with adults through the Grandparenting Clause will only be available for a limited period of time. Applications will need to be submitted and the process completed within 3 years from the date of publication of this document.
 
  • Application for the UKCP Supervision Grandparenting Route must be made to an Organisational Member (OM) in the first instance. The standards described here are based on the existing requirements for competence of the UKCP standards framework for supervision work with psychotherapeutic practitioners working with adults.
 
  • The development of these standards is essential for Colleges where their OMs wish to put people forward to be placed on the UKCP Register of Supervisors for Adult Psychotherapy and Psychotherapeutic Counselling or where the OM is an accrediting organisation solely for the purpose of putting people to the register of supervisors.
 
  • It is acknowledged that no document can be exhaustive in its scope; however, the guidelines set out herein are intended to set a tone, character and attitudinal approach to the development of supervision grandparenting guidelines by Colleges and centrally by UKCP.
 
  • As with all the Training, Education and Practice Guidelines and Requirements of UKCP, these guidelines should be understood as forming part of the quality assurance and regulatory map of UKCP, its Colleges and its OMs.
 
  • Please see the list at the end of this document for the correct titles of all other UKCP documents relating to minimum generic guidelines and requirements for education and training standards of supervision and routes to supervisor accreditation, including specific documents relating to working with children.
 
  1. Definition
 
  • Supervision is understood as a process conducted within a formal working relationship in which a qualified or trainee psychotherapeutic practitioner presents client work to a designated supervisor, as a way of learning how to work more effectively with clients.
 
  • The purpose is to ensure safe and competent practice through regular meetings.Colleges should set out the media through which supervision can take place and any requirements for frequency and ratios of clinical work to supervision hours that the modality requires.
 
  1. GRANDPARENTING REQUIREMENTS
3.1 There are two routes to registration as a College Supervisor:
  1. First Route:Through successful completion of a College and UKCP recognised Supervisor Training Course.
(See documents: UKCP College of Hypno-psychotherapists Standards for Supervision and UKCP College of Hypno-psychotherapists SETs for Supervision)
  1. Second Route:Through the successful application to be considered under the Grandparenting Scheme for existing supervisors. (This document).
3.2 All supervisors offered to the Register via Grandparentingmust normally fulfil the following criteria:  
  1. Must be UKCP Registrant with a minimum of 5 years experience as a psychotherapeutic practitioner post-qualification or UKCP recognised professional equivalent;
  2. At least 3 years’ experience of post-registration work as a supervisor / or 50 hours of formal supervision given (50 % or more of this should normally be one-to-one supervision);
  3. Where an applicant has qualified, registered and practises in more than one modality approachas a psychotherapeutic practitioner or UKCP recognised professional equivalent they must:
 
  1. Demonstrate at least 2 yearsof formally supervised experience of work with clients as a qualified registered Psychotherapy Practitioner in eachsupervised as per modality requirements at the timeand
 
  1. Demonstrate at least 5 years of formally supervised experience of work with clients overallsupervised as per modality requirements at the time
  Where an applicant has qualified, registered and practises in one modality approachthey must demonstrate at least 5 years of formally supervised experience of work with clients supervised as per modality requirements at the time
  1. Must have been in formal individual supervision of supervision for at least 25 hours.
  An applicant for the Grandparenting Route to Registration as a UKCP Supervisor must meet the standards laid out in UKCP College of Hypno-psychotherapists Standards for Supervision  
  • These must incorporate the UKCP minimum generic standards as set out elsewhere in this document and any others applicable from the other generic standards on supervision published by the UKCP and its relevant committees and
  1. Standards for supervisors
  2. Responsibility to the supervisee
  3. Clinical responsibilities
  4. Diversity and Equality Considerations
  5. The Supervisors Responsibility to Self
  6. Produces / presents a short written model of their Supervision Framework including style, approach and understanding of supervision (we recommend that this should be no more than 1.5 to 2 sides of A4 typed);
  Acknowledgement: Please note these guidelines are the culmination of work done by several organisations and individuals within and without the UKCP over a number of years across several modalities. All the contributors known and unknown, are thanked for their thoughts, ideas, efforts and contributions. Documents Training Standard of UKCP  – 1993 UKCP Training Standards: Policy and Principles – 2001 Psychotherapy with Children; UKCP Guidelines for Training -2003 Psychotherapy with Children; Principles, Aims and Guidelines for Training -2007 UKCP Standards of Education and Training: policy and Principles 2012    

 

Quinquennial Review / Organisation Application All Organisational Members of the College of Hypno-psychotherapists are subject to the UKCP Quinquennial Review Process. The process is identical to the Organisation Application Process in that Organisations who are applying need to demonstrate the same elements as those who are already members. The purpose of review Review is an opportunity for a member organisation to reflect on the evidence and experience of delivering education provision over the period of the last 5 years. The organisation will be asked to complete the QR form and provide evidence of compliance of all requirements, both generic and College specific. Review also provides the College of Hypno-psychotherapists of UKCP with the opportunity to assure itself that:
  • the quality and academic standards of the provision are being maintained
  • the organisation’s monitoring processes have been used effectively to update the provision and maintain standards since the last review
  • teams are identifying trends and issues emerging from monitoring and developments within the profession, and then reflecting on the effectiveness of the actions taken.
The intensity of the review will depend on:
  • the evidence available to assure the Reviewers that provision is of the appropriate quality and standard
  • the evidence of the thoroughness of monitoring and the actions taken in response
  • the rigour of the critical analysis of, and comment on, data
  • feedback from students, external examiners and others.
Existing documentation Existing documents should be used as supporting evidence. The list below is indicative, and the Review team  will determine exact requirements. This documentation should  normally  be made available to  the Review team when they visit the Organisation and, where possible, also electronically.
  • currentcourse specifications including details of course aims, learning  outcomes, assessment regime and curriculum content
 
  • sample module or unit guides
 
  • student handbooks and guides
 
  • Code of Ethics and Practice
 
  • organisation documents, e.g. assessment handbook, placement guide, project guide
 
  • self monitoring reports for the 4 years preceding the review
 
  • external examiner reports and responses for the last 4 years
 
  • evidence of student feedback to the organisation, module/unit evaluation data and analysis, summary of issues and responses raised in staff-student liaison committees or equivalent
 
  • complaints and grievance procedures and details of substantive complaints made by students relating to the education provision together with evidence of how these were resolved (data should be anonymised)
 
  • data on student admission, progression and completion with accompanying commentary and analysis
 
  • policy and other relevant documents on:
 
  • admissions
  • learning and teaching
  • appeals
  • external examining
  • research
  • equal opportunities and diversity
  • bullying and harassment
  • academic misconduct
  • learner welfare
  • resources
  • APL, APEL, APCL and CATS
  • clinical supervision
  • personal psychotherapy experience
  • CPD
  • management structures
  Evidence of implementation of the above
  • evidence of teaching observations of teaching staff, comprising a log of   observations taking place over the year preceding the review and outcomes (e.g. staff development sessions)
  • current staff CVs including research, scholarship, professional practice and consultancy, or any other evidence of these activities
  • samples of student assignments and feedback provided on them
  • minutes of relevant meetings, normally including School Board, and relevant staff-student liaison committee/s.
   

Current Members of College Awaken School of Outcome Oriented Psychotherapies 13 South Parade, Northallerton, North Yorkshire, DL7 8SE T: 0845 8732036, 01609 780060 E: awakenschool@aol.com W: www.awakenschool.co.uk BeeLeaf Institute of Contemporary Psychotherapy(Beeleaf) BeeLeaf House, 34 Grove Road, London E3 5AX T: 020 8983 9699 F: 020 89811017 E: info@beeleaf.com W: www.beeleaf.com National College of Hypnosis and Psychotherapy (NCHP) PO Box 5779, Loughborough, LE12 5ZF T: 0845 2578735 E: enquiries@nchp.org.uk W: www.hypnotherapyuk.net National Register for Hypnotherapists and Psychotherapists (NRHP) First Floor, 18 Carr Rd, Nelson, Lancs, BB9 7JS T: 01282 716839 E: admin@nrhp.co.uk W: www.nrhp.co.uk  

Operating Procedures Membership of The College is open to all organisations providing training in Hypno-Psychotherapy, or being a professional registering association for hypno-psychotherapists. Organisational Members (OM’s) shall be entitled to membership provided
  • They meet the current UKCP Criteria
  • They meet the current College Criteria
  • They have applied for membership and been approved by the College and the UKCP Organisational Membership Committee
  • The College comprises any number of OM’s professional training who have fulfilled both UKCP and College criteria and undergone such inspection procedures as are necessary. Each OM has two delegates who are entitled to attend all College Meetings. OM’s will be expected to send at least a single delegate to College to work on their and the College’s behalf.
College Officers: Chair (Automatic representative to the Professional Regulatory Committee of Colleges and Faculties and the Psychotherapy Council) Secretary Treasurer Representatives to the Ethics Committee, Organisational Membership Committee, Education, Training and Practice Committee, Professional Occupational Practice Committee, and Diversities, Equalities and Social Responsibility Committee. These posts are elected positions and are held for three years. If the holder is willing to stand he/she may be re-elected. Elections and Meeting Schedules for the year will be decided at the final College Meeting of any given calendar year. On 15 January every three years, current College Officers are offered the opportunity to stand for re-election. OM’s are notified as to their intentions and are offered the opportunity to field a candidate for both vacant and non vacant posts. The deadline for such nomination will be 15 February of that year with an election to be held (if needed) at the CH-P Meeting which immediately proceeds this date. Success in the elections will be a simple majority. In the event of a tie, the current Chair will have the casting vote, and that vote will normally be to maintain the status quo, where applicable. Member Organisations may be asked to field additional persons to serve on College subcommittees as and when appropriate. Additionally, every three years an election will take place for ordinary members of the College Executive who are individual members of College and are not officers, directors or employees of any College OM. The number of individual seats will depend on the current number of College OM’s. At the time of writing there are four OM’s of College and therefore four individual members who sit on the College Executive. A call for candidates are done on the 15thof January every three years and their election (if needed) is conducted in the same manner as officers of College. Minutes Procedures In order to reduce the time spent approving minutes at meetings, the following stages are completed where necessary: The Secretary types up the minutes and circulates them to all delegates in good time for the next meeting (ie normally not less than one week prior to the meeting) Minutes relating to College Governance will be sent to UKCP via the Registrar to keep on file in central office. College Communication College acknowledges the difficulties in the past with OM and delegate communication. In order to rectify this, the following procedures are adopted. Minutes of College Meetings will be distributed via email from the Secretary normally within one week of the meeting. The opportunity will be given to make additions and amendments for up to 2 weeks after distribution with a final draft to be circulated and tentatively agreed within 4 weeks of the College Meeting. College Reports will be sent to the Chair within one week of the relevant meeting, at which point the Chair will either distribute them to College via email or get clarification from the delegate or Chair of Committee where there is any question of confidentiality or anything that preclude immediate distribution. Substantive issues which College needs to either vote on, agree to, or discuss, will be sent via the Chair with a two week period of discussion/revision. If it is to be a voting issue, the will of College will be served by a simple majority, with dissenting views noted for the record. Communication of a personal , sensitive or commercial nature will not normally be permitted through College Communication. In this event, OM’s or delegates will be advised as to the proper procedure or channels to address these issues. Meetings: The Secretary agrees the agenda with the Chair, and sends out agenda to all delegates. Specific item(s) for discussion may be requested to the Chair at least two weeks prior to meeting, or may be requested at commencement of meeting to be an item under AOB. Apologies for absence are made in advance to the Secretary or Chair. The Secretary takes minutes at the meeting. A list of correspondence between OM’s or OM and Chair is circulated to all delegates at time of writing. Correspondence going out from College is circulated to all delegates at time of writing. Correspondence to College Chair from outside College is normally copied and circulated to delegates when received. As stated above the yearly schedule of College Meetings will be determined at the UKCP AGM College meeting. Debate and Voting Procedures Each agenda item is discussed freely. When an item is agreed by consensus, a formal motion proposal is unnecessary. When a vote is taken, the following is observed. Each member organisation is allowed one vote (ie one voted for up to two delegates) If delegates split their vote (one for and one opposed) the vote is discounted If one delegate abstains, that OM vote goes according to that of the other delegate In the event of an equal count, the Chair has the casting vote   College Sub Committees College representatives to the Education, Training and Practice, Ethics, Organisational Membership, Professional Occupational and Diversity, Equality and Social Responsibility Committees of UKCP will Chair the College Sub Committee which covers each responsibility if the executive at the time feels there is a need for a separate sub-committee. Membership of these subcommittees will be made up of a representative from each OM, except for the Chair of the Subcommittee’s OM, which he/she will represent. OM’s will be responsible for nominating members of subcommittees and covering reasonable expenses for these individuals for travel and sustenance. The College accounts are kept by the College Treasurer. Each organisation is responsible for the travel expenses of its delegates to College executive meetings. OM’s share equally in any other expenses incurred by delegate(s) in pursuance of College business provided such expenses are agreed in advance by College to be legitimate College business. Each OM needs to prepare an annual statement of absorbed expenses to be submitted to the College Treasurer before the end of September and otherwise as UKCP procedures. College sees this as not a static document but an organic one which can be amended to meet changes to UKCP policy in the future.

Conflicts of Interest All members of the CH-P executive will strive to avoid any conflict of interest, where possible, between the interests of the College on the one hand, and personal, professional, and business interests on the other. If conflicts are unavoidable they must be disclosed to allow other members to take the conflict into consideration in their deliberations. This includes the perception of conflicts of interest as well as actual. The purposes of this policy is to protect the integrity of the College’s decision-making process, to enable our members to have confidence in our integrity, and to protect the integrity and reputation of all involved. Examples of conflicts of interest include: 1          Members of the executive are also members of UKCP and so discussion about any rules affect them. 2          Relationships (business or personal) between members of the executive 3          A member of the executive who is also on the committee of another organisation that could be seen as a competitor. 4          A member of the executive who has shares in, is employed by or is otherwise connected to a business that may be affected by decisions of the executive. Upon appointment each committee member will make a full, written disclosure of interests, such as relationships, and posts held, that could potentially result in a conflict of interest. This written disclosure will be kept on file and I will be updated as appropriate. The second item in all meetings (following apologies) will be to address potential conflicts of interest that can be foreseen. In the course of meetings or activities, members of the executive will disclose any interests in a transaction or decision where there may be a conflict between the College’s best interests and their own best interests or a conflict between the best interests of two organisations that they are involved with. In most situations the member in question will be allowed to remain in the meeting and participate fully. The meeting may also decide that it is either a) not appropriate for the member to remain or b) that they may remain but not participate in the debate or c)that they remain, participate but not vote. Any such disclosure and the subsequent actions taken will be noted in the minutes. This policy is meant to supplement good judgment, and members should respect its spirit as well as its wording.